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Please feel free to learn more about the microchipping process by reading the FAQ information below.

What is Homeward Bound Pet?
Why register with Homeward Bound Pet?
Are there any annual fees?
Does my pet have to be microchipped with any certain brand of microchip in order to utilize the Homeward Bound Pet service?
What if my pet is found and I am unreachable at the contact number on file with Homeward Bound Pet?
What if my pet is turned in at a shelter that isn't equipped with a scanner?
My pet always wears a collar with an identification tag. Is microchipping really necessary?
How do I know that my pet's microchip ID number will remain unique to him?
What is a microchip?
How does a microchip work?
How much does the injection cost?
How long does a microchip last?
What is the youngest age a pet can be microchipped?
My pet never leaves my home or yard. Why should he be identified with a microchip?
Does my pet have to be sedated for the injection?
Does the procedure hurt my pet?
Could my pet be allergic to a microchip?
I am planning an international vacation with my pet. What do I need to know?
My pet is lost. What should I do to find him?


What is Homeward Bound Pet?

Homeward Bound Pet is an advanced lost pet recovery service dedicated to the safety and well-being of your pet. Our system is best utilized when a microchip with a unique ID number is injected between the shoulder blades of your pet, which can be done by a veterinarian if your pet is not already microchipped. Once your pet is microchipped, the next step is to enroll your pet's microchip ID, description, and photo, along with your contact information, in Homeward Bound Pet’s database, which is critical to reuniting you immediately with your lost pet once he is found.

Why register with Homeward Bound Pet?

One in three pets will be lost, at least temporarily, during their lifetime. Even pets that live in the house are frequently snatched, or find a way out when very afraid or lonely. Microchipping your pet and registering your contact numbers with that chip are a part of responsible pet ownership today. If your pet disappears, shelters, veterinarians and rescue organizations can access your registration information directly thru this website. Hundreds of thousands of pets are reunited with their owners in this way every year. You can access your account at any time to update emails, phone numbers or other information, keeping Homeward Bound Pet completely current and ready to serve you.

Are there any annual fees?

No. Once your pet is enrolled with Homeward Bound Pet, it is enrolled for life.

Does my pet have to be microchipped with any certain brand of microchip in order to utilize the Homeward Bound Pet service?

No. Pets with any brand of microchip may enroll in the Homeward Bound Pet service.

What if my pet is found and I am unreachable at the contact number on file with Homeward Bound Pet?

When you enroll your pet, we will ask you to provide contact information for an alternate, like a relative, close friend, or a veterinarian, in case you are unreachable when your pet is found. Your alternate contact will then be called if you cannot be reached. It is critical that you keep your contact information - as well as the contact information for your alternate contact - up-to-date with Homeward Bound Pet.

What if my pet is turned in at a shelter that isn't equipped with a scanner?

Virtually all veterinarians and shelters in the U.S. (over 50,000 nationally) are equipped to scan your pet should he become lost.

My pet always wears a collar with an identification tag. Is microchipping really necessary?

All pets should wear collar tags with their name and the phone number of their owner or veterinarian. Tags, though, may become worn and impossible to read or may slip off. Collars themselves can break or slip off. Tattooing pets with a number is another method of identifying pets; however, veterinarians and pet rescue experts say tattoos can blur over time, and they can be altered. A microchip is the only form of pet identification that is permanent, with a unique number that cannot be altered or removed.

How do I know that my pet's microchip ID number will remain unique to him?

With all the possible combinations of product codes and ID numbers, there are more than enough numbers to make sure every pet has a completely unique number. These tiny microchips are designed to produce 275 billion different ID numbers. On top of that, microchip manufacturers add unique product codes and manufacturer's codes to identify their microchips. Rest assured, your pet will always have an ID number all his own.

What is a microchip?

A microchip is a tiny integrated circuit, encapsulated in a biocompatible material. It is capable of relaying information to a handheld scanner of the same frequency. It cannot be tracked via GPS devices. It is small enough to fit inside a hypodermic needle and can be injected under the skin of your pet, where it will stay for the life of the animal. This provides a permanent, positive identification that cannot be lost, altered or removed - a safe, simple and inexpensive way to protect your pet against loss or theft.

How does a microchip work?

The computer memory in a microchip contains a unique number - no two animals will ever have the same number. A radio signal is used to read this number through the skin of your pet. In addition to the number, the microchip generates a reliability check to guarantee that your pet's identifying number is read accurately.

How much does the injection cost?

The price for implanting a microchip varies from one veterinarian to another, but the average is around $45. Many pet retailers and veterinarians provide a discount if you have the microchip implanted at the time of purchase or while the pet is in for routine grooming, surgery, dental work or vaccinations.

How long does a microchip last?

Once injected under the skin of your pet, the microchip becomes encased by a thin layer of protein that anchors it in place for the rest of the life of your pet. It does not pass through or out of the body. The microchip itself has no power supply to replace or moving parts to wear down. Therefore, it can be expected to last for decades - well beyond the lifespan of most pets.

What is the youngest age a pet can be microchipped?

Animals of any age can be injected with a microchip. Puppies and kittens are identified during their initial vaccine series. Birds, horses and exotics can be identified at any time.

My pet never leaves my home or yard. Why should he be identified with a microchip?

It's wonderful that you're keeping your pet safe, but it only takes one time for the mailman, gardener, meter reader, neighbor or friend to leave the gate open or the door ajar. There's also a possibility that your house could be damaged in a heavy storm, flood, or other natural disaster, causing your pet to run away in fear. Pets can even be stolen - particularly exotics or purebred animals. No matter how closely you watch your favorite animal friend, there's always a chance they can get out, and if they don't have any ID, they will be extremely hard to find.

Does my pet have to be sedated for the injection?

No! Injecting a microchip is just like any other injection or vaccination. Anesthesia is not required or recommended since there is minimal discomfort with the procedure.

Does the procedure hurt my pet?

Not at all. The injection creates only a slight discomfort - most pets don't even react to it. The microchip is encapsulated in a specially formulated biocompatible material created specifically for this kind of application.

Could my pet be allergic to a microchip?

Microchips are inert and biocompatible. There is virtually no chance of the body developing an allergy or trying to reject the microchip after being properly injected.

I am planning an international vacation with my pet. What do I need to know?

The following are some helpful links for determining what you need to do in order to take your pet to another country.

National Center for Import and Export (NCIE) A part of the USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), this organization regulates the import and export of animals in the US.

USDA Pet Export Information From the NCIE, this page contains specific information - including general instructions and links to further information - about the procedures for taking pets abroad.

Regulations by Country This page contains links to regulations in place in more than 100 countries.

My pet is lost. What should I do to find him?

Everything you need to know is right here: click to open.

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